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The Doublesix Dice Story

The Doublesix Dice story is not a short one.  

It has been a labor of love, blood, sweat, and tears with lots of support from our passionate backers who kept us going as we navigated the ups and downs of creating and importing these beauties.  

Kickstarter

  • I had zero experience with Kickstarter or production, but wanted to try to launch a card game that I had developed.
  • Seeing that dice were popular on Kickstarter (and seemingly easy to produce), I decided to first do a trial campaign involving dice to get experience with Kickstarter. 
  • I eventually came up with this idea, and planned to call them Ruby Reds.  I later discovered that this idea had been patented, but luckily, the patent had expired. 
  • I made some laser-etched prototypes via Eric, found some manufacturers on Alibaba, and filmed a quick pitch video on my Ipad. 
  • I asked for $3,340 dollars to produce the minimum 5,000 order.
  • During the 55-day campaign, backers got very involved, sharing ideas for colors and designs. I added Triplefours due to popular demand.
  • When the campaign ended, about 6,916 backers pledged $133,495 dollars, and made about 7,000 comments (not including the ones in the 50+ updates).

Production

  • Production began with the company I initially chose, Ningbo. However, there were problems with communication and production.
  • Specifically, Ningbo attempted to make the dice using a metal mold, which caused concerns around pip depth and paint integrity.
  • I found another company, Longbright, who had recommended using silicone molds from the start, and went with them, though my production costs doubled. 
  • There were various me challenges along the way, which caused significant delays. 
  • Eventually, the backers got their dice, over 15 months past the estimated delivery date.

Now

  • I ordered excess dice with the intent of selling them to the public via an online store.
  • If Generation One sells well, I will involve the community in determining Generation Two styles and colors. 
  • Once the store is running smoothly, I plan to run several more Kickstarters this year, including evolving the card deck (printed in the US), a digital product, and a Kickstarter community-idea.